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Monkey God

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The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story | Preston, Douglas | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch. The Lost City of the Monkey God | Preston, Douglas | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Sūn Wùkōng (chinesisch 孫悟空 / 孙悟空, W.-G. Sun Wu-k'ung) ist im klassischen chinesischen Der König der Affen; Monkey King – Ein Krieger zwischen den Welten (Serie); The Forbidden Kingdom; The Monkey​. Die CD The Sorcerers: In Search Of The Lost City Of The Monkey God jetzt probehören und kaufen. Mehr von The Sorcerers gibt es im Shop. Jetzt Monkey God Spielen! Jetzt Spielen Melde dich an & spiele mit Echtgeld. RTP: % Min/Max Wetteinsatz: – Volatilität: Mittel (6/10).

Monkey God

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Douglas lives in New Mexico. In , swashbuckling journalist Theodore Morde returned from the rainforest with hundreds of artefacts and an electrifying story of having found the City - but then committed suicide without revealing its location. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who fled there to escape the Spanish invaders, and warn the legendary city is cursed : to enter it is a death sentence.

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They had contracted a horrifying, incurable and sometimes lethal disease. They emerged from the jungle with proof of the legend Einband Taschenbuch Seitenzahl Erscheinungsdatum Es wurden noch keine Bewertungen geschrieben. Erste Bewertung excellent Beste Spielothek in Modring-Schattseite finden consider. They call it the Lost City of the Monkey God. Douglas lives in New Mexico.

Before Anjana returned to heaven, Hanuman asked his mother about his life ahead. She assured him that he would never die, and said that fruits as ripe as the rising sun would be his food.

Mistaking the glowing sun as his food, the divine baby leaped for it. The god of the heavens Indra struck him with his thunderbolt and hurled him back down to earth.

Hanuman's godfather Pavana carried the burned and broken child to the netherworld or Patala. But as Pavana departed from the earth, he took all the air with him, and the creator god Brahma had to beg him to return.

In order to appease Pavana, the gods conferred many boons and blessings on his foster child, making Hanuman invincible, immortal, and powerful: a monkey god.

Hanuman selected the sun god Surya as his preceptor and asked Surya to teach him the scriptures.

Surya agreed and Hanuman became his disciple; but as the sun god, Surya traveled constantly. Hanuman took his lessons from his constantly moving guru by traversing the sky backward at an equal pace.

Hanuman's phenomenal concentration allowed him to master the scriptures in only 60 hours. For Hanuman's tuition fees, Surya would have accepted the manner in which Hanuman accomplished his studies, but when Hanuman asked him to accept something more than that, the sun god asked Hanuman to assist his son Sugriva, by becoming his minister and compatriot.

Traditionally, Hindu people keep fast and give special offerings in honor of Hanuman as a weekly ritual week, on Tuesdays and, in some cases, Saturdays.

In times of trouble, it is a common faith among Hindus to chant the name of Hanuman or sing his hymn " Hanuman Chalisa " and proclaim "Bajrangbali Ki Jai" —"victory to thy thunderbolt strength.

Hanuman temples are among the most common public shrines found in India. The character of Hanuman is used in the Hindu religion as an example of the unlimited power that lies unused within each human individual.

Hanuman directed all his energies towards the worship of Lord Rama, and his undying devotion made him such that he became free from all physical fatigue.

And Hanuman's only desire was to go on serving Rama. In this manner, Hanuman perfectly exemplifies 'Dasyabhava' devotion—one of the nine types of devotions—that bonds the master and the servant.

His greatness lies in his complete merger with his Lord, which also formed the base of his genial qualities.

It amazed me that a valley so primeval and unspoiled could still exist in the twenty-first century. It was truly a lost world, a place that did not want us and where we did not belong.

We planned to enter the ruins the following day. What would we find? I couldn't even begin to imagine it. View all 13 comments.

For centuries Hondurans have told their children the myth of the Lost City of the Monkey God, but myths are often rooted in fact, and in the early Oughts cinematographer and inveterate searcher for lost cities Steve Elkins starts looking for it.

Preston begins his story with a briefing by an ex-soldier experienced in jungle trav For centuries Hondurans have told their children the myth of the Lost City of the Monkey God, but myths are often rooted in fact, and in the early Oughts cinematographer and inveterate searcher for lost cities Steve Elkins starts looking for it.

Preston begins his story with a briefing by an ex-soldier experienced in jungle travel who passes around a photo of someone on a previous expedition bitten by a fer-de-lance.

It isn't pretty. More cheery news of the local fauna follows in the way of mosquitoes and sand flies eager to pass on lovely diseases like malaria, dengue fever and the dread leishmaniasis.

Never heard of it? Me, either, and Preston, either, but he'll hear a lot more about it shortly.

At the end of that first chapter he writes "I paid attention. I really did. This book is simply packed with information on a dozen different topics, to begin with a history of archeology in Central and South America and worldwide, legal and not It must be said that, in general, if archaeologists refused on principle to work with governments known for corruption, most archaeology in the world would come to a halt; there could be no more archaeology in China, Russia, Egypt, Mexico, most of the Middle East, and many countries in Central and South America, Africa and Southeast Asia.

I present this not as a justification or an apology, but as an observation on the reality of doing archaeology in a difficult world.

This is why the legend of the White City runs so deep in the Honduran national psyche: It's a direct connection to a pre-Columbian past that was rich, complex, and worthy of remembrance.

The rain forest has a lot of leaves, but the lidar confounds even that dense canopy and discovers the Lost City and maybe two just three days into the mapping process.

I could see Sartori's spiral-bound notebook lying open next to the laptop. In keeping with the methodical scientist he was, he had been jotting daily notes on his work.

Preston is clearly a man in love Once again I had the strong feeling, when flying into the valley, that I was leaving the twenty-first century entirely.

A precipitous ridge loomed ahead, marking the southern boundary of T1. The pilot headed for a V notch in it. When we cleared the gap, the valley opened up in a rolling landscape of emerald and gold, dappled with the drifting shadows of clouds.

The two sinuous rivers ran through it, clear and bright, the sunlight flashing off their riffled waters as the chopper banked Towering rainforest trees, draped in vines and flowers, carpeted the hills, giving way to sunny glades along the riverbanks.

Flocks of egrets flew below, white dots drifting against the green, and the treetops thrashed with the movement of unseen monkeys.

I'm glad he's that good a writer because the only way I want to experience this place is through his prose and the photos, thanks.

I certainly would never even attempt to keep up with Chris Fisher or Dave Yoder in the jungle, that's for sure. And then there is leishmaniasis, a ghastly disease which infects Preston and half of the expedition.

It's like cancer in that the cure is as bad as the disease and as of writing the book Preston's has recurred.

In even cheerier news, due to the enabling offices of climate change leishmaniasis is steadily making its way north, occurring now in Texas and Oklahoma.

Although Americans dying of it may be the only way to get the drug companies working on a cure, because why bother if it's only killing poor people in the Third World?

I mean that's no way to make money. But the leishmaniusis gives him the final clue to perhaps solve the puzzle: Where did the people of the Lost City go?

And why did they leave and, especially, when? Also known as: Disease as destiny. Impossible to recommend this book highly enough.

View all 8 comments. This was about so much more than the Lost City--it was packed with information, presented in a palatable way and even tone.

I feel stupidly excited by how much I learned and how incredibly interested I was in absolutely every facet of this discovery and the ripple effect of the exploration itself.

View 2 comments. Some never came ba 4. Some never came back, others returned in defeat, and some were charlatans - pretending to explore while they searched for gold.

Obstacles to success included ignorance of the city's exact location, impassable jungles, venomous snakes, biting and stinging insects, jaguars, and - in recent times - narcotraficantes drug cartels.

Elkins' team included himself, a photographer, an archaeologist, an anthropologist, filmmakers, a squad of Honduran soldiers, pilots, technicians, a jungle safety expert, and others.

This time, Preston was assigned to pen an article for National Geographic Magazine. The entire escapade into La Mosquitia was dangerous and difficult, starting with preparing landing sites for the team's helicopters.

This was followed by setting up camping areas, hacking through the impenetrable jungle with machetes, wading across rivers, hiking up hills, sliding down hills, encountering snakes, being bitten by insects and spiders, and so on.

In addition, the team members were continually soaked and muddy, had trouble keeping a fire lit in the wet jungle, and subsisted largely on MREs freeze-dried meals.

The 'kitchen area' of the expedition's campsite The Honduras expedition was difficult and wet Preston describes his first campsite, where he set up his hammock under a tree inhabited by squawking spider monkeys - who didn't want him there.

Spider Monkey When the author stepped out the first night - to relieve himself - the ground was writhing with a carpet of rainforest cockroaches.

Cockroaches When I lived in a tent for six weeks for geology field camp, I learned not to drink anything after PM Ha ha ha Preston also tells a memorable story about encountering a six-foot-long, venomous fer-de-lance near his camping area.

Fer-de-Lance The writer summoned the jungle safety expert, Andrew Wood, who decapitated the snake after it squirted his hand with burning venom.

Wood had to wash his hand immediately The expedition carried antivenom shots, just in case. Even more ominously, Preston's tent was invaded by tiny sandflies night after night, which he took to skewering on one of his notebooks - a ledger that became so damaged he had to throw it away.

Unfortunately the writer - and other members of the expedition - were repeatedly bitten by the little critters, which had dire consequences later on.

Sandfly Though there were hardships, the team members were able to make their way to T-1, where they found a treasure trove of pre-Columbian remains, including asymmetrical mounds and a large cache of almost buried artifacts.

These artifacts include beautiful stone bowls and carved stone figures, some of which have half-human, half-monkey features. One striking statuette resembled a jaguar - which led to the site being called 'The City of the Jaguar.

By now, extensive studies are under way. Chris Fischer - who was a member of Elkins' team - notes: "The excavated area [at T-1] encompasses less than square feet of the enormous archaeological site, which includes at least 19 prehistoric settlements, probably part of a single chiefdom, spread along several miles of a river.

One of the nearby sites has two parallel mounds that may be the remains of a Mesoamerican ball court similar to those left by the Maya civilization, indicating a link between this culture and its powerful neighbors to the west and north.

The ballgame was a sacred ritual While the City of the Jaguar is spectacularly isolated now, at its heyday it was probably a center of trade and commerce.

Chris Fischer noted the City of the Jaguar was once a center of trade So what happened to the historic city? Why was it abandoned?

No one knows for sure but Preston suggests that infectious diseases decimated the population.

It's well known that European explorers brought deadly illnesses, like flu, measles, and smallpox, to the New World.

The native people, having no resistance, died in droves It's possible that most residents of the 'T-sites' died, and the remaining occupants - thinking their gods had forsaken them - just walked away from their homes.

Indigenous people may have been wiped out by disease Another illness may also have contributed to the ancient carnage.

Months after Preston returned home, he noticed a 'bug bite' that refused to heal. The author came to learn that he and many other members of the trip had contracted leishmaniasis, a flesh-eating disease caused by a protozoan parasite that's transmitted by sandflies.

Left untreated, leishmaniasis can cause skin ulcers; mouth and nose ulcers; and damage to internal organs.

In the worst cases, the disease eats away the nose and mouth, causing horrible disfiguration. Luckily, Preston responded to treatment -which is harsh, and can take a long time.

Leishmaniasis The disease didn't stop Preston from returning to T-1 for one more visit, however, during which he lamented the inevitable changes caused by official visitors, scientists, and the military - who protect the site from looters and narcotraficantes.

La Mosquitia area in Honduras where ancient artifacts were found In addition to detailing the recent visits to La Mosquitia, Preston tells stories about early explorers to the New World; native peoples of the region; disease germs brought to the Americas by sick sailors; fortune hunters looking for the White City; the current President of Honduras - who's all for archaeological and anthropological exploration; Elkins' efforts to finance his expeditions and films; the author's and his colleagues' struggles with leishmaniasis; and more.

I liked all the stories and enjoyed the book, which I highly recommend to readers interested in the topic. View all 15 comments. As a longtime fan of the Pendergast series that Douglas Preston writes together with Lincoln Child was I curious to read this non-fiction book about a lost city.

I find mysteries like this very intriguing. I mean a lost city that is mentioned in old documents, but no one has found?

What's not to like? And, what makes this book so fantastic is that Douglas Preston himself was part of the expedition to what could be White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God.

A place where no one has been for c As a longtime fan of the Pendergast series that Douglas Preston writes together with Lincoln Child was I curious to read this non-fiction book about a lost city.

A place where no one has been for centuries, a place with a lot of deadly creatures like the deadly fer-de-lance, one of the most deadly snakes on the planet.

The Lost City of the Monkey God captivated me from the beginning, Preston has written a well-researched book, which gives the reader both the historical background as well as the impressions from the expedition.

I always love books that are entertaining and learning as well, and Preston has managed that. The only thing I found a bit dreary was the technical descriptions of the equipment that they used to pinpoint the city, but I got the gist and that was enough for me.

I'm just not that interested in technical things so stuff like that always makes me a bit bored. But, I fully understand the need for it to be included in the story.

Especially since it pissed off archaeologists who think that it's cheating to use lidar to find lost cities.

I loved that part of the story, how petty some archaeologists were. As much as I enjoyed reading the historical background must I admit that reading about the expedition, how they were the first ones there were very thrilling.

I could easily picture the scenery and I found the discovery of the city and artifacts fascinating. Although I'm not sure I would want to travel there with all the bugs and deadly snakes.

The Lost City of the Monkey God was a truly great book. I loved learning more about the history of Honduras and it made me sad to think about how the Europeans arrival pretty much killed off most of the natives all over America thanks to the sickness they brought with them.

View all 5 comments. Douglas Preston's account of his adventure to La Mosquitia an unexplored, uninhabited region of forest in the Honduran wilderness in search of the Lost City of the Money Gods.

Since the days of conquistador Hernan Cortes, rumours have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God.

Indigenous tribe's 3. Indigenous tribe's folklore warn that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die.

A journalist by the name of Theodore Morde returned in from the rainforest with hundreds of artefacts and an incredible story of having found the city of the monkey Gods but died before revealing its exact location.

In the Author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists along with a new machine that would change everything: lidar, technology that could map the terrain under the densest rainforest canopy.

I really enjoyed this book and the trials and discoveries of the team of adventurers. Books like these are different and I enjoy learning about undiscovered sites, the rain forest and its inhabitants of monkeys, snakes and insects but its certainly a place I don't intend visiting after reading this account.

These previously unexplored sites are now in danger of looting, deforestation and tourism and a debate on how to explore and protect them can be daunting for all concerned.

I read this on Kindle and there were quire a few pictures at the end of the book but am sure the quality would be much better with a hard copy.

An interesting and informative book that I really enjoyed and I will be keeping this site on my radar as the exploration is on-going and I am sure we will hear more from The City of the Monkey Gods and Doug Preston.

Mar 26, J. Preston begins by offering historical research of an earlier search for the city which, despite the hype, probably never located the city and might not have even been looking for it.

However, comparing his expedition with the one 80 or so years earlier allows him to discuss scientific advan In The Lost City of the Monkey God, Douglas Preston presents an engaging account of an expedition setting out to re discover a lost city in the jungles of Honduras the White City or City of the Monkey God.

However, comparing his expedition with the one 80 or so years earlier allows him to discuss scientific advancements especially of lidar which will revolutionize the field.

Despite any advancements, adventure and danger go hand-in-hand during Preston's expedition. That danger doesn't seem to be ill-founded.

The expedition had to overcome impenetrable jungle, quickmud, one of the world's most aggressive and deadly snakes, the fer-de-lance, and disease carrying insects.

In fact, tropical disease strikes most of those in the expedition something they don't realize until they're back in their home countries.

Identifying and treating the disease they have contracted becomes another mystery to solve; this mystery and discussion of the disease dominates the final sections of the book.

Oct 03, J. Definitely one of the best books I read in This is an incredibly fascinating and detailed book involving science, history, and adventure.

Highly recommended. View all 16 comments. Who knew that there were so many civilizations in the Northern Hemisphere, The Lost City of the Monkey God takes us deep into the Mosquitia region of the Gracias a Dios Department in eastern Honduras, where the legendary "White City" supposedly existed.

Lidar is able to map the ground even through dense rain forest, delineating any archaeological features that might be present.

What they found was a huge city. Was it the legendary "White City"? Who knows. What ensues is the physical search of the area. If you have read any books on entering tropical rain forests you know they are fraught with dangers, while I appreciate the amount of time, effort and money invested in this project I am not wholly convinced that it is the riveting tale we are lead to believe we are getting.

It is more a long version of the National Geographic article. From here Preston, takes off on a tangent about how those in the archaeology of Central America community attacked their expedition because Elkins billed it as finding the LOST "White City" which they archaeologist believe is a myth.

The last part of the book is about Leishmaniasis, the disease that Preston and many of his fellow crew members caught. It was interesting to learn what treatment they went through to contain the disease.

Preston then goes on to speculate that the people of the city they found where wiped out by some disease that occurred during the contact period with explorers.

There is nothing to back this up. I read this book because Dana Stabenow rated with 5 stars and provided a rave review. I was not so impressed.

This review was originally posted on The Pfaeffle Journal I'm glad that I reserved the audio at my library. I enjoyed this story, but was slightly disappointed at the time spent actually exploring.

The beginning of the book goes into previous expeditions to areas near this city and the problems faced due to the fact that Honduras can be a very dangerous country.

Not only due to the insects, snakes and other poisonous creatures, but also because of The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story is not my normal cuppa, but came to me highly recommended.

Not only due to the insects, snakes and other poisonous creatures, but also because of drug cartels.

The brief portion that involved the actual exploration was fascinating. Imagine going into an area completely untouched by mankind in hundred years.

How exciting! However, the actuality of exploring such an area means exposing oneself to thousands of dangers from extremely deep mud, insects of all kinds, snakes and even jaguars, to name just a few.

There was another brief section talking about the problems with other archaeologists and academia throwing shade on this expedition, some of them doing so with no REAL knowledge of what went on, how LIDAR worked and what was found.

Lastly, and the part I found most interesting, was what happened to many of the explorers after they got home and that is: Leishmaniasis.

This is a disease, actually many diseases and symptoms, grouped under one name , which is mainly carried by tiny sand flies. The havoc this disease can wreak is almost unbelievable.

This led to another section of the book which spoke about new world diseases and how they affected the Americas. There is talk of how some of the early civilizations disappeared and how that may have been caused by parasites and diseases.

I found all of this fascinating but extremely scary. Most especially when it was mentioned that cases of Leish have now been found in Texas and the speculation about how that is because sand flies are moving northward due to climate change.

What I found most surprising is that many of the explorers that were diagnosed and treated for Leish, jumped at the chance to go back to the site.

I enjoyed this book and I learned a lot about Honduras and its history. I recommend The Lost City of the Monkey God to anyone interested in learning more about Honduras, the city and the history of the world, in general.

Libraries RULE! View all 9 comments. Special thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

It's no secret that I love Douglas Preston. I've read and reread his co-authored Special Agent Pendergast series multiple times.

I've worked with the publishers for the past few years for ARCs of that series and interviewed Mr. Preston and Lincoln Child, his Pendergast co-author.

I've read pretty much everything they've both ever written, with a few things still remaining on my to-read p Special thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

I've read pretty much everything they've both ever written, with a few things still remaining on my to-read pile. I also love adventure stories.

Lost temples, jungle treks, scary wildlife, special teams going in to discover the past I subscribe to Preston's email newsletters, and I was aware of his long-term interest in the lost White City of Honduras.

I paid attention when they used the lidar to map some potential locations of this city in the Honduran jungles, and gobbled up details when they set out on their expedition.

This book provides Preston's account of his take on the whole scenario -- from the history of the search for the lost city, to his actual involvement, to the aftereffects of that fateful journey.

It's a solid read, which I expect from Preston, who is a fantastic writer. My biggest gripe is the end. I know it's a non-fiction weaving of historical detail into modern day adventure memoir, but the last few chapters focus solely on the deadly and scary disease that affects much of the third world, and hit many of the explorers.

It turns from a lesson on the White City and a recording of the adventure into a public service notice about the future of the disease and the need for treatments to be researched and available to all, not only because the disease is quickly passing from third world into first world, but mostly because of the millions of people it affects and the tens of thousands it kills on a yearly basis in the third world, where they have no financial ability to pay for treatment and big pharm sees no profit in it.

Don't get me wrong -- I entirely agree with Preston's views on the subject. I think my problem was that the book was about the adventure into what might have been the source for the legends of the Lost City of the Monkey God, so rather than ending on the disease chapters, those could have been put into the middle and the ending been something more suited to the adventurous side of the tale and how much more we have to learn from the past.

Just my opinion, but that's what reviews are. Either way, I read very little non-fiction, and this book kept my focus and my attention, and showcases Preston's strong talents.

You should really take the opportunity to follow in Preston and team's footsteps into the jungles of Honduras. Just watch out for the venomous and aggressive fer-de-lance snakes and the leish-transmitting sandflies Lucky for you, you're safe on your couch.

Wow, well this had a little bit of everything! Archeological adventure story, ancient culture history, Honduras politics, revelations about lesser-known diseases and more.

Loved it from beginning to end. View 1 comment. It was reputed to be a city of immense wealth. Indigenous tribes warned that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die.

There have been many stories about sightings of this lost city. Some of these outright hoaxes. None have proven it's existence.

In the twentieth century there were several expeditions to locate this lost city. Probably the most famous being an expedition led by Theodore Morde in He returned with thousands of artifacts to back his claim of having discovered the city but committed suicide and never revealed it's location.

Using an advanced laser-imaging technology called LIDAR they were able to penetrate the dense jungle canopy to detect man-made anomalies at two locations.

Flying in a rickety plane, Vietnam era helicopters, sleeping in a jungle infested with venomous snakes and disease carrying insects.

They had returned from the first expedition thinking they were lucky to have all survived only to discover later that half of them had contracted a horrific, sometimes lethal, and incurable disease.

There is a bit of history and politics here too. I had heard stories about the impact when the Old World and New World collided and how disease wiped out many of the indigenous tribes.

This book reminded me of how devastating it was. There was the difficulty of dealing with the seeming ever changing Honduran government and obtaining permits.

Then there were the problems with the academic community which labeled the expedition as adventurers and treasure hunters.

The book ends with a warning about climate change and the increased danger of pandemics as the world is shrinking and a disease is only a plane ride away from any civilization.

An adventure story with a message. View all 4 comments. I was expecting a non-fiction adventure story told by one of my favorite thriller authors, but this book really covers a lot more territory than that.

In the La Mosquitia region of Honduras, there was rumored to be a lost city where people once worshipped a monkey like statue. There were also rumors about the unfortunate fate that would befall people who went looking for this city.

The beginning of this book describes a lot of failed and fraudulent expeditions searching for the city. It was supp I was expecting a non-fiction adventure story told by one of my favorite thriller authors, but this book really covers a lot more territory than that.

It was supposedly found in the s by a man who died without revealing its location. Some of the explorers not only didn't find the city but weren't even looking for it but were searching for gold instead.

In the end, the jungle was too dense and the search area too large to permit a success, until modern technology made the search easier.

In , the author became part of a team of scientists who were able to locate from the air what they assumed were man-made structures buried in the jungle, but it wasn't until that they actually entered the jungle to verify this assumption.

At this point, the book became the adventure story I was expecting. There were also poisonous snakes, killer mud and swarms of biting insects which turned out to be more dangerous than the snakes.

No amount of curiosity would have gotten me on this expedition, but the author seemed happy as a clam to be there.

They discovered caches of artifacts and the book describes the competing theories about the placement and meaning of these artifacts, in addition to the ethics of excavating and removing artifacts vs studying them in situ.

It appears that the entire civilization vanished virtually at once. After the explorers left the jungle, several members of the team developed a parasitic disease, about which I would have preferred not to hear.

However the author had a point or several points to make with his detailed description of the disease and its treatment. Civilizations rise until they meet their inevitable demise.

It can be fast or slow and pandemics definitely speed things up. Ignoring diseases common in poor nations or remote parts of the world could lead to their worldwide spread.

These and other important issues felt a little crammed into the final chapters of the book. They probably deserved their own book.

I received a free copy of the hardcover version of this book from the publisher, which was useful for looking at the pictures.

However, I wound up listening to the audiobook borrowed from the library. Rumors of ancient lost cities awaken in us dreams of making great archeological discoveries and finding buried treasure, but as is so often the case, these are only to be achieved by most of us through a vicarious armchair adventure like this one!

In this true story, author Douglas Preston takes us along on his journey deep into the heart of the rainforest in Honduras, as a team of scientists, filmmakers, hired guards, soldiers and others try to find traces of the fabled White City aka the Lost Rumors of ancient lost cities awaken in us dreams of making great archeological discoveries and finding buried treasure, but as is so often the case, these are only to be achieved by most of us through a vicarious armchair adventure like this one!

In this true story, author Douglas Preston takes us along on his journey deep into the heart of the rainforest in Honduras, as a team of scientists, filmmakers, hired guards, soldiers and others try to find traces of the fabled White City aka the Lost City of the Monkey God.

Preston is there to cover this expedition for National Geographic and is partnered with photographer Dave Yoder to record their experiences.

The group sets off on Valentine's Day, , heading to one of three remote locations that had been pinpointed earlier by a high-tech lidar machine and other GPS data as likely spots to start looking.

Preston describes the arduous process of preparing landing sites for the helicopters, flying in people and equipment, setting up camp and finally doing some actual unearthing of artifacts.

In the process, they are beseiged by bugs, frightened by snakes and soaked in torrential rains. Meanwhile, the clock continues to tick--they only have two weeks to accomplish at least some of their goals before they must return expensive equipment and vacate the area.

And what they find is astounding, as the photos Preston includes reveal! But their efforts are rewarded with criticism from the academic world.

And did they happen to bring back the curse of the Monkey God? Preston's book also includes some historical background and tales of earlier adventurers that I'm sure you will find as interesting as I did.

And he makes some predictions for what the future holds for the spread of weird 'new' diseases as global warming changes our planet.

Read for my library's Readers Roundtable for February, Especially once I found out that much of the action takes place in Honduras, a country that I have been interested in visiting for several years.

But I think I may be cured of that desire now. You see, in addition to the anthropological research and the jungle exploration poisonous snakes, hip deep mud, and unremitting 3.

You see, in addition to the anthropological research and the jungle exploration poisonous snakes, hip deep mud, and unremitting rain, anyone?

A number of the team were infected with Leishamaniasis by the bites of sand flies. What is easily done can be difficult to undo and they struggle to find treatment options.

Most of the world's victims of this disease are among the poorest people on earth--if they had money to spend on drugs, the pharma companies would be doing the necessary research.

But that's not the way things are. Now, I am one of those people that biting insects adore. In fact, I was just at a family reunion and I think I heard everyone say at some point, "Oh, mosquitoes love me!

But I am hardly encourages to brave Hondruas, even for the most beautiful bird. Sorry, Lovely Cotinga! Mar 05, L. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. As a true story, this book doesn't follow a conventional narrative arc.

Instead, it reaches what one thinks of the climax, makes a right turn into relevant history of disease introduced to the Americas by Europeans, and concludes by circling back to a different parasite that inhabits this rain-drenched paradise.

This is an amazing book. The lost city is central to Honduran As a true story, this book doesn't follow a conventional narrative arc.

The lost city is central to Honduran First Nations as a Canadian would describe it history and as such, adds an entire new dimension to the country's culture.

The find was so significant that the president of Honduras ceremonially removed the first artifact for study. Preston doesn't hesitate to include quotes from the naysayers yet he retains a journalist's objectivity throughout.

A nice touch: one can read the first six chapters for free on Nook or Kindle. The opening paragraphs will pull in many readers, as they did me.

Highly recommended to thriller, mystery, and suspense readers, and to all interested in Central American and North American history--and to those who study diseases.

View all 3 comments. Fascinating, sobering, and mind-blowing. Yes, we start with a jungle expedition that is thwarted, then attempted again.

We get snarling insults about colonial arrogance and disregard for native peoples. Add in massive and aggressive snakes who shoot venom at those lucky enough not to have their Kevlar boot gaitors pierced by fangs as long as my thumbs.

Insect bites, clear cutting of rainforest, looting. Elongate human skulls coated in clear crystals, like pale sugared candies glinting by lantern light.

We get parasites. And I totally get Preston. Loved this. Takeaway: White people are an insensitive, self-aggrandizing, entitled lot, especially the American male ones.

And that's how they got a curse. So now you're ready to read my thoughts because, despite being told that was NOT what was going on, all those images above kept running through my head as I listened to this and I feel they should inspire you, as well.

You're welcome. After I gave up my plans to be a ballerina around age 4 I hated gymnastics and when I realized ballet was more of the same but different, I was like, Nope!

Or marine biology. But there weren't a lot of oceans or marine life in the middle of Colorado.

However, there were plenty of things to dig out of the dirt and I was exceptionally good at digging in dirt.

A career path was born. It was later dashed when I entered college and saw the ridiculous amount of math I'd have to take in order to pursue my dreams and I was like, Nope!

And now I have a BA in English. But between age 4 and age 17, I crammed a ton of archaeology and paleontology, as well as cryptozoology and mythology because related fields, into my brain.

I loved it! Pottery fragments? Exhuming graves? Mesa Verde? Dinosaur National Monument? I retain a strong sentimental love for all the misinformation I fed myself during those years so it's not a surprise I ran, shrieking with glee, into this story, full-tilt, pith helmet secured on top of my ponytail, knife in my calf holster.

I was ready. I was not disappointed. This was amazing. And, seriously, we are a horrible bunch of people. Because who else but the descendants of English colonizers and Spanish conquistadors would think it's perfectly acceptable to go into someone else's country with a film crew to dig up their old growth jungles in order to chase myths and maybe gain some fame in the process?

That is NOT ok! Thankfully, Preston does touch upon this a few times and it was a bit of a balm to know that, yes, we should know better and that there are people out there who protest this kind of spoiled, dickish behavior.

But, you know, what's done is done Note: The city wasn't lost to everyone in the area who knew it was there. It was only lost to white people who felt it needed to be found and dug up.

Also, the government of Honduras thought finding said mythical place would be pretty good PR during a shaky time so even though the native tribes in the Mosquitia area were all, "Um, don't go in there.

It's cursed. We've been staying out of that area for years, we know what we're talking about," the government was like, "Don't listen to them.

They're poor and dirty. Go on in. Here are some elite soldiers to protect you from the crazydangerous drug runners that run around those hills.

Then get back with us when you find something. Make sure it's something cool because we really need a pick-me-up right now.

It was almost as if some external force was keeping him away. But he persisted. For, like, 22 years. He talked to this other guy, Ron Blom , who worked at NASA and had helped to find another "lost" city ok, that one was actually lost.

It got swallered up by a sinkhole and then sanded over in the '90's. Ron Blom had used technology for finding old cities and roads and Elkins wondered if that technology could be used in the jungle, too.

Spoiler alert: it couldn't. However, it did remind people to keep an eye on fancy advances in treasure hunting apparatusi.

Note: By this point in the story, and I think I was still on the first disc, I was swooning. Also, squealing with glee. I was in the middle of my fondest wet dream!

Rediscovering the remnants of ancient cultures who have been quiet for ages! Oh, goodness, I'm fanning myself even now. Our fearless writer, a sometime journalist for National Geographic, is on board.

There's a film crew and an archeologist and a couple of experts on ancient Honduran cultures, and the two hero-types who are in charge of keeping the group safe and getting them to where they need to be and the aforementioned elite soldiers and some pilots and a LIDAR technician.

There's a big crew of people, mostly men, mostly white, and they're all heading into the Honduran jungle to fuck things up.

Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»The Lost City of the Monkey God«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! The Monkey King story comes from Wu Chen- gen's Hsi Yu Chi (The Journey to the West, For this, he is rewarded as king of the monkeys and with immortality. Ramayana in the Lahore Museum a pair of monkeys are shown drinking from a That representations of the Monkey-god have long been admired is clear from. Perfekte Monkey God Stock-Fotos und -Bilder sowie aktuelle Editorial-​Aufnahmen von Getty Images. Download hochwertiger Bilder, die man nirgendwo sonst.

The Jade Emperor adopted a pacifist attitude towards the Monkey God by bestowing him celestial title thinking that it would encourage good behavior.

However, it was a lowly title effectively making him a stable attendant in heaven. The peaches ripen only once several thousand years and immortals were invited to enjoy the peaches that confer longevity to whoever ate it.

The Monkey God was extremely annoyed when he realized he was not invited. Not to be insulted, the Monkey God invited himself there and consumed all the peaches while creating more havoc.

His behavior attracted retaliation from the Jade Emperor who sent celestial warriors to capture him. Although the Monkey God defeated them initially, he was finally caught and thrown into a cauldron that produces elixirs but he survived.

Seeing no effective way of controlling the Monkey god, the Jade Emperor asked the Buddha for help and finally managed to subdue the Monkey God.

The Monkey God is frequently depicted in sculptures, paintings and performed as a character in Chinese operas. He is also worshipped as a Taoist Deity in temples and shrines.

Hanuman courage and strength, Narasimha fearlessness, Garuda magical skills and the power to cure snake bites, Varaha health and exorcism and Hayagriva victory over enemies , blew the 5 oil lamps in 5 directions and severed the head of Mahiravana by thus killing him.

He later took Shri Rama and Lakshmana on his shoulders and as he flew outside Shri Rama saw Makardhwaja tied with his tail. He rightaway ordered Hanuman to crown him the King of Patala.

The story of Ahiravan finds its place in the Ramayanas of the East. It can be found in the Bengali version of the Ramayana, written by Krittibash.

It is also believed that after being pleased with Hanuman, Goddess Kali blessed him to be her dwara-paal or gate-keeper and hence one finds Bhairava and Hanuman on either sides of the temple entrance of the Goddess' shrine.

Also, in the Tibetan version, novel elements appear such as Hanuman carrying love letters between Rama and Sita, in addition to the Hindu version wherein Rama sends the wedding ring with him as a message to Sita.

Further, in the Tibetan version, Rama chides Hanuman for not corresponding with him through letters more often, implying that the monkey-messenger and warrior is a learned being who can read and write.

In the Sri Lankan versions of Ramayana, which are titled after Ravana, the story is less melodramatic than the Indian stories. Many of the legends recounting Hanuman's bravery and innovative ability are found in the Sinhala versions.

The stories in which the characters are involved have Buddhist themes, and lack the embedded ethics and values structure according to Hindu dharma.

In both China and Japan, according to Lutgendorf, much like in India, there is a lack of a radical divide between humans and animals, with all living beings and nature assumed to be related to humans.

There is no exaltation of humans over animals or nature, unlike the Western traditions. A divine monkey has been a part of the historic literature and culture of China and Japan, possibly influenced by the close cultural contact through Buddhist monks and pilgrimage to India over two millennia.

As Hanuman does not know the herb he brings the entire mountain for the hero to choose from. By that time a learned medicine man from Lanka discovered the cure and Hanuman brings the mountain back to where it came from.

Many Japanese shinto shrines and village boundaries, dated from the 8th to the 14th centuries, feature a monkey deity as guardian or intermediary between humans and gods kami.

Paumacariya also known as Pauma Chariu or Padmacharit , the Jain version of Ramayana written by Vimalasuri, mentions Hanuman not as a divine monkey, but as a Vidyadhara a supernatural being, demigod in Jain cosmology.

He is the son of Pavangati wind deity and Anjana Sundari. Anjana gives birth to Hanuman in a forest cave, after being banished by her in-laws.

Her maternal uncle rescues her from the forest; while boarding his vimana , Anjana accidentally drops her baby on a rock.

However, the baby remains uninjured while the rock is shattered. The baby is raised in Hanuruha. There are major differences from the Hindu text : Hanuman is a supernatural being in Jain texts, Rama is a pious Jaina who never kills anyone, and it is Lakshamana who kills Ravana.

Hanuman becomes a supporter of Rama after meeting him and learning about Sita 's kidnapping by Ravana. He goes to Lanka on Rama's behalf, but is unable to convince Ravana to give up Sita.

Ultimately, he joins Rama in the war against Ravana and performs several heroic deeds. In several versions of the Jain Ramayana story, there are passages that explain to Hanuman, and Rama called Pauma in Jainism , Hanuman, in these versions, ultimately renounces all social life become a Jain ascetic.

After the birth of the martial Sikh Khalsa movement in , during the 18th and 19th centuries, Hanuman was an inspiration and object of reverence by the Khalsa.

During the colonial era, in Sikh seminaries in what is now Pakistan , Sikh teachers were called bhai , and they were required to study the Hanuman Natak , the Hanuman story containing Ramcharitmanas and other texts, all of which were available in Gurmukhi script.

There exist non-Indian versions of the Ramayana, such as the Thai Ramakien. Another legend says that a demigod named Matsyaraja also known as Makardhwaja or Matsyagarbha claimed to be his son.

Matsyaraja's birth is explained as follows: a fish matsya was impregnated by the drops of Hanuman's sweat, while he was bathing in the ocean.

However, in some cases, the aspects of the story are similar to Hindu versions and Buddhist versions of Ramayana found elsewhere on the Indian subcontinent, valmiki Ramayana is the original holy text Others are edited versions by the poet's for performing Arts like folk dances, the true story of Ramayana is Valmikis, Sage Valmiki known as the Adikavi "the first poet".

Hanuman became more important in the medieval period and came to be portrayed as the ideal devotee bhakta of Rama.

According to Philip Lutgendorf, devotionalism to Hanuman and his theological significance emerged long after the composition of the Ramayana , in the 2nd millennium CE.

His prominence grew after the arrival of Islamic rule in the Indian subcontinent. He is stated to be a gifted grammarian, meditating yogi and diligent scholar.

He exemplifies the human excellences of temperance, faith and service to a cause. In 17th-century north and western regions of India, Hanuman emerged as an expression of resistance and dedication against Islamic persecution.

For example, the bhakti poet-saint Ramdas presented Hanuman as a symbol of Marathi nationalism and resistance to Mughal Empire.

Hanuman in the colonial and post-colonial era has been a cultural icon, as a symbolic ideal combination of shakti and bhakti , as a right of Hindu people to express and pursue their forms of spirituality and religious beliefs dharma.

Hanuman's iconography shows him either with other central characters of the Ramayana or by himself. If with Rama and Sita, he is shown to the right of Rama, as a devotee bowing or kneeling before them with a Namaste Anjali Hasta posture.

If alone, he carries weapons such as a big Gada mace and thunderbolt vajra , sometimes in a scene reminiscent of a scene from his life.

In the modern era, his iconography and temples have been common. He is typically shown with Rama, Sita and Lakshmana, near or in Vaishnavism temples, as well as by himself usually opening his chest to symbolically show images of Rama and Sita near his heart.

He is also popular among the followers of Shaivism. In north India, aniconic representation of Hanuman such as a round stone has been in use by yogi , as a means to help focus on the abstract aspects of him.

He is also shown carrying a saffron flag in service of Goddess Durga along with Bhairav. Hanuman is often worshipped along with Rama and Sita of Vaishnavism , sometimes independently.

In some regions, he is considered as an avatar of Shiva by Shivites. Tuesday and Saturday of every week are particularly popular days at Hanuman temples.

Some people keep a partial or full fast on either of those two days and remember Hanuman and the theology he represents to them.

Hanuman is a central character in the annual Ramlila celebrations in India, and seasonal dramatic arts in southeast Asia, particularly in Thailand; and Bali and Java, Indonesia.

Ramlila is a dramatic folk re-enactment of the life of Rama according to the ancient Hindu epic Ramayana or secondary literature based on it such as the Ramcharitmanas.

Hanuman's birthday is observed by some Hindus as Hanuman Jayanti. It falls in much of India in the traditional month of Chaitra in the lunisolar Hindu calendar , which overlaps with March and April.

The festive day is observed with devotees gathering at Hanuman temples before sunrise, and day long spiritual recitations and story reading about the victory of good over evil.

Hanuman is a revered heroic figure in Khmer history in southeast Asia. He features predominantly in the Reamker , a Cambodian epic poem, based on the Sanskrit Itihasa Ramayana epic.

In Cambodia and many other parts of southeast Asia, mask dance and shadow theatre arts celebrate Hanuman with Ream same as Rama of India.

Hanuman is represented by a white mask. Hanuman is the central character in many of the historic dance and drama art works such as Wayang Wong found in Javanese culture, Indonesia.

These performance arts can be traced to at least the 10th century. In major medieval era Hindu temples, archeological sites and manuscripts discovered in Indonesian and Malay islands, Hanuman features prominently along with Rama, Sita, Lakshmana, Vishvamitra and Sugriva.

Hanuman, along with other characters of the Ramayana , are an important source of plays and dance theatre repertoire at Odalan celebrations and other festivals in Bali.

Hanuman plays a significantly more prominent role in the Ramakien. In another, Hanuman takes on the form of Ravana and sleeps with Mandodari , Ravana's consort, thus destroying her chasity, which was the last protection for Ravana's life.

As in the Indian tradition, Hanuman is the patron of martial arts and an example of courage, fortitude and excellence in Thailand.

He is depicted as an albino white, strong character with open mouth in action, sometimes shown carrying a trident.

However, once Hanuman was flying above the seas to go to Lanka , a drop of his sweat fell in the mouth of a crocodile, which eventually turned into a baby.

The monkey baby was delivered by the crocodile, who was soon retrieved by Ahiravana , and raised by him, named Makardhwaja , and made the guard of the gates of Patala, the former's kingdom.

One day, Hanuman, when going to save Rama and Lakshmana from Ahiravana, faced Makardhwaja and defeated him combat.

Later, after knowing the reality and after saving both, he made his son, the king of Patala. The Jethwa clan claims to be a descendant of Makardhwaja, and, according to them, he had a son named Modh-dhwaja, who in turn had a son named Jeth-dhwaja, hence the name of the clan.

While Hanuman is a quintessential character of any movie on Ramayana , Hanuman centric movies have also been produced with Hanuman as the central character.

In the first biopic movie on Hanuman was released with legendary wrestler Dara Singh playing the role of Hanuman.

He again reprised the character in Ramanand Sagar 's television series Ramayan and B. Chopra 's Mahabharat. In an animated movie Hanuman was released and was extremely popular among children.

Actor Mukesh Khanna voiced the character of Hanuman in the film. Another movie Maruti Mera dost was a contemporary adaptation of Hanuman in modern times.

The Bollywood movie Bajrangi Bhaijaan had Salman Khan playing the role of Pawan Kumar Chaturvedi who is an ardent Hanuman devotee and regularly invokes him for his protection, courage and strength.

Hanuman was referenced in the Marvel Cinematic Universe film, Black Panther , which is set in the fictional African nation of Wakanda ; the "Hanuman" reference was removed from the film in screenings in India.

The Mexican acoustic-metal duo, Rodrigo Y Gabriela released a hit single named "Hanuman" from their album Each song on the album was made to pay tribute to a different musician that inspired the band, and the song Hanuman is dedicated to Carlos Santana.

The reason for the use of the name Hanuman is unclear, but the band has stated that Carlos Santana "was a role model for musicians back in Mexico that it was possible to do great music and be an international musician.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Hanuman disambiguation. Anjeyanadri Hill , Koppal district , Karnataka [3].

Supreme deity. Important deities. Holy scriptures. Related traditions. Sita's scepticism Vanaranam naranam ca kathamasit samagamah Translation: How can there be a relationship between men and monkeys?

Main articles: Rama in Jainism and Salakapurusa. This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it.

June Williams Handbook of Hindu Mythology. Oxford University Press. Hatcher Hinduism in the Modern World. The Mahabharata: Volume 3.

Penguin Books. Gordon Melton; Martin Baumann Tradition and Modernity in Bhakti Movements. Brill Academic. Ryan Encyclopedia of Hinduism.

Retrieved 14 July Motilal Banarsidass. Walker , Indigenous or Foreign? September , Editor: Victor H. Gautam ed. India through the ages.

Sacred Animals of India. Penguin Books India. Vani Prakashan. Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Puranas, Volume 1. Eck Devotion divine, Bhakti traditions from the regions of India: studies in honour of Charlotte Vaudeville.

Egbert Forsten. Sarvadeshik Arya Pratinidhi Sabha. The third meaning of Rudra is Vayu or air that causes pain to the wicked on the account of their evil actions Despite my jungle fears, this was a nice follow-up to The Lost City of Z by David Grann, which was about the search for an ancient civilization in the Amazon.

I highly recommend both books, but I'm going to take a break from jungle stories for a while. Meaningful Passage [On Preston's first night in the jungle he spotted a giant venomous snake that one of the crew members wrestled with and killed.

The jungle, reverberating with sound, was much noisier than in the daytime. Several times I heard large animals moving past me in the darkness, blundering clumsily through undergrowth, crackling twigs.

I lay in the dark, listening to the cacophony of life, thinking about the lethal perfection of the snake and its natural dignity, sorry for what we had done but rattled by the close call.

A bite from a snake like that, if you survived at all, would be a life-altering experience.

In a strange way the encounter sharpened the experience of being here. It amazed me that a valley so primeval and unspoiled could still exist in the twenty-first century.

It was truly a lost world, a place that did not want us and where we did not belong. We planned to enter the ruins the following day.

What would we find? I couldn't even begin to imagine it. View all 13 comments. For centuries Hondurans have told their children the myth of the Lost City of the Monkey God, but myths are often rooted in fact, and in the early Oughts cinematographer and inveterate searcher for lost cities Steve Elkins starts looking for it.

Preston begins his story with a briefing by an ex-soldier experienced in jungle trav For centuries Hondurans have told their children the myth of the Lost City of the Monkey God, but myths are often rooted in fact, and in the early Oughts cinematographer and inveterate searcher for lost cities Steve Elkins starts looking for it.

Preston begins his story with a briefing by an ex-soldier experienced in jungle travel who passes around a photo of someone on a previous expedition bitten by a fer-de-lance.

It isn't pretty. More cheery news of the local fauna follows in the way of mosquitoes and sand flies eager to pass on lovely diseases like malaria, dengue fever and the dread leishmaniasis.

Never heard of it? Me, either, and Preston, either, but he'll hear a lot more about it shortly. At the end of that first chapter he writes "I paid attention.

I really did. This book is simply packed with information on a dozen different topics, to begin with a history of archeology in Central and South America and worldwide, legal and not It must be said that, in general, if archaeologists refused on principle to work with governments known for corruption, most archaeology in the world would come to a halt; there could be no more archaeology in China, Russia, Egypt, Mexico, most of the Middle East, and many countries in Central and South America, Africa and Southeast Asia.

I present this not as a justification or an apology, but as an observation on the reality of doing archaeology in a difficult world.

This is why the legend of the White City runs so deep in the Honduran national psyche: It's a direct connection to a pre-Columbian past that was rich, complex, and worthy of remembrance.

The rain forest has a lot of leaves, but the lidar confounds even that dense canopy and discovers the Lost City and maybe two just three days into the mapping process.

I could see Sartori's spiral-bound notebook lying open next to the laptop. In keeping with the methodical scientist he was, he had been jotting daily notes on his work.

Preston is clearly a man in love Once again I had the strong feeling, when flying into the valley, that I was leaving the twenty-first century entirely.

A precipitous ridge loomed ahead, marking the southern boundary of T1. The pilot headed for a V notch in it. When we cleared the gap, the valley opened up in a rolling landscape of emerald and gold, dappled with the drifting shadows of clouds.

The two sinuous rivers ran through it, clear and bright, the sunlight flashing off their riffled waters as the chopper banked Towering rainforest trees, draped in vines and flowers, carpeted the hills, giving way to sunny glades along the riverbanks.

Flocks of egrets flew below, white dots drifting against the green, and the treetops thrashed with the movement of unseen monkeys.

I'm glad he's that good a writer because the only way I want to experience this place is through his prose and the photos, thanks. I certainly would never even attempt to keep up with Chris Fisher or Dave Yoder in the jungle, that's for sure.

And then there is leishmaniasis, a ghastly disease which infects Preston and half of the expedition.

It's like cancer in that the cure is as bad as the disease and as of writing the book Preston's has recurred. In even cheerier news, due to the enabling offices of climate change leishmaniasis is steadily making its way north, occurring now in Texas and Oklahoma.

Although Americans dying of it may be the only way to get the drug companies working on a cure, because why bother if it's only killing poor people in the Third World?

I mean that's no way to make money. But the leishmaniusis gives him the final clue to perhaps solve the puzzle: Where did the people of the Lost City go?

And why did they leave and, especially, when? Also known as: Disease as destiny. Impossible to recommend this book highly enough.

View all 8 comments. This was about so much more than the Lost City--it was packed with information, presented in a palatable way and even tone.

I feel stupidly excited by how much I learned and how incredibly interested I was in absolutely every facet of this discovery and the ripple effect of the exploration itself.

View 2 comments. Some never came ba 4. Some never came back, others returned in defeat, and some were charlatans - pretending to explore while they searched for gold.

Obstacles to success included ignorance of the city's exact location, impassable jungles, venomous snakes, biting and stinging insects, jaguars, and - in recent times - narcotraficantes drug cartels.

Elkins' team included himself, a photographer, an archaeologist, an anthropologist, filmmakers, a squad of Honduran soldiers, pilots, technicians, a jungle safety expert, and others.

This time, Preston was assigned to pen an article for National Geographic Magazine. The entire escapade into La Mosquitia was dangerous and difficult, starting with preparing landing sites for the team's helicopters.

This was followed by setting up camping areas, hacking through the impenetrable jungle with machetes, wading across rivers, hiking up hills, sliding down hills, encountering snakes, being bitten by insects and spiders, and so on.

In addition, the team members were continually soaked and muddy, had trouble keeping a fire lit in the wet jungle, and subsisted largely on MREs freeze-dried meals.

The 'kitchen area' of the expedition's campsite The Honduras expedition was difficult and wet Preston describes his first campsite, where he set up his hammock under a tree inhabited by squawking spider monkeys - who didn't want him there.

Spider Monkey When the author stepped out the first night - to relieve himself - the ground was writhing with a carpet of rainforest cockroaches.

Cockroaches When I lived in a tent for six weeks for geology field camp, I learned not to drink anything after PM Ha ha ha Preston also tells a memorable story about encountering a six-foot-long, venomous fer-de-lance near his camping area.

Fer-de-Lance The writer summoned the jungle safety expert, Andrew Wood, who decapitated the snake after it squirted his hand with burning venom.

Wood had to wash his hand immediately The expedition carried antivenom shots, just in case. Even more ominously, Preston's tent was invaded by tiny sandflies night after night, which he took to skewering on one of his notebooks - a ledger that became so damaged he had to throw it away.

Unfortunately the writer - and other members of the expedition - were repeatedly bitten by the little critters, which had dire consequences later on.

Sandfly Though there were hardships, the team members were able to make their way to T-1, where they found a treasure trove of pre-Columbian remains, including asymmetrical mounds and a large cache of almost buried artifacts.

These artifacts include beautiful stone bowls and carved stone figures, some of which have half-human, half-monkey features. One striking statuette resembled a jaguar - which led to the site being called 'The City of the Jaguar.

By now, extensive studies are under way. Chris Fischer - who was a member of Elkins' team - notes: "The excavated area [at T-1] encompasses less than square feet of the enormous archaeological site, which includes at least 19 prehistoric settlements, probably part of a single chiefdom, spread along several miles of a river.

One of the nearby sites has two parallel mounds that may be the remains of a Mesoamerican ball court similar to those left by the Maya civilization, indicating a link between this culture and its powerful neighbors to the west and north.

The ballgame was a sacred ritual While the City of the Jaguar is spectacularly isolated now, at its heyday it was probably a center of trade and commerce.

Chris Fischer noted the City of the Jaguar was once a center of trade So what happened to the historic city? Why was it abandoned?

No one knows for sure but Preston suggests that infectious diseases decimated the population. It's well known that European explorers brought deadly illnesses, like flu, measles, and smallpox, to the New World.

The native people, having no resistance, died in droves It's possible that most residents of the 'T-sites' died, and the remaining occupants - thinking their gods had forsaken them - just walked away from their homes.

Indigenous people may have been wiped out by disease Another illness may also have contributed to the ancient carnage.

Months after Preston returned home, he noticed a 'bug bite' that refused to heal. The author came to learn that he and many other members of the trip had contracted leishmaniasis, a flesh-eating disease caused by a protozoan parasite that's transmitted by sandflies.

Left untreated, leishmaniasis can cause skin ulcers; mouth and nose ulcers; and damage to internal organs. In the worst cases, the disease eats away the nose and mouth, causing horrible disfiguration.

Luckily, Preston responded to treatment -which is harsh, and can take a long time. Leishmaniasis The disease didn't stop Preston from returning to T-1 for one more visit, however, during which he lamented the inevitable changes caused by official visitors, scientists, and the military - who protect the site from looters and narcotraficantes.

La Mosquitia area in Honduras where ancient artifacts were found In addition to detailing the recent visits to La Mosquitia, Preston tells stories about early explorers to the New World; native peoples of the region; disease germs brought to the Americas by sick sailors; fortune hunters looking for the White City; the current President of Honduras - who's all for archaeological and anthropological exploration; Elkins' efforts to finance his expeditions and films; the author's and his colleagues' struggles with leishmaniasis; and more.

I liked all the stories and enjoyed the book, which I highly recommend to readers interested in the topic. View all 15 comments.

As a longtime fan of the Pendergast series that Douglas Preston writes together with Lincoln Child was I curious to read this non-fiction book about a lost city.

I find mysteries like this very intriguing. I mean a lost city that is mentioned in old documents, but no one has found? What's not to like?

And, what makes this book so fantastic is that Douglas Preston himself was part of the expedition to what could be White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God.

A place where no one has been for c As a longtime fan of the Pendergast series that Douglas Preston writes together with Lincoln Child was I curious to read this non-fiction book about a lost city.

A place where no one has been for centuries, a place with a lot of deadly creatures like the deadly fer-de-lance, one of the most deadly snakes on the planet.

The Lost City of the Monkey God captivated me from the beginning, Preston has written a well-researched book, which gives the reader both the historical background as well as the impressions from the expedition.

I always love books that are entertaining and learning as well, and Preston has managed that. The only thing I found a bit dreary was the technical descriptions of the equipment that they used to pinpoint the city, but I got the gist and that was enough for me.

I'm just not that interested in technical things so stuff like that always makes me a bit bored. But, I fully understand the need for it to be included in the story.

Especially since it pissed off archaeologists who think that it's cheating to use lidar to find lost cities. I loved that part of the story, how petty some archaeologists were.

As much as I enjoyed reading the historical background must I admit that reading about the expedition, how they were the first ones there were very thrilling.

I could easily picture the scenery and I found the discovery of the city and artifacts fascinating. Although I'm not sure I would want to travel there with all the bugs and deadly snakes.

The Lost City of the Monkey God was a truly great book. I loved learning more about the history of Honduras and it made me sad to think about how the Europeans arrival pretty much killed off most of the natives all over America thanks to the sickness they brought with them.

View all 5 comments. Douglas Preston's account of his adventure to La Mosquitia an unexplored, uninhabited region of forest in the Honduran wilderness in search of the Lost City of the Money Gods.

Since the days of conquistador Hernan Cortes, rumours have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God.

Indigenous tribe's 3. Indigenous tribe's folklore warn that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die. A journalist by the name of Theodore Morde returned in from the rainforest with hundreds of artefacts and an incredible story of having found the city of the monkey Gods but died before revealing its exact location.

In the Author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists along with a new machine that would change everything: lidar, technology that could map the terrain under the densest rainforest canopy.

I really enjoyed this book and the trials and discoveries of the team of adventurers. Books like these are different and I enjoy learning about undiscovered sites, the rain forest and its inhabitants of monkeys, snakes and insects but its certainly a place I don't intend visiting after reading this account.

These previously unexplored sites are now in danger of looting, deforestation and tourism and a debate on how to explore and protect them can be daunting for all concerned.

I read this on Kindle and there were quire a few pictures at the end of the book but am sure the quality would be much better with a hard copy.

An interesting and informative book that I really enjoyed and I will be keeping this site on my radar as the exploration is on-going and I am sure we will hear more from The City of the Monkey Gods and Doug Preston.

Mar 26, J. Preston begins by offering historical research of an earlier search for the city which, despite the hype, probably never located the city and might not have even been looking for it.

However, comparing his expedition with the one 80 or so years earlier allows him to discuss scientific advan In The Lost City of the Monkey God, Douglas Preston presents an engaging account of an expedition setting out to re discover a lost city in the jungles of Honduras the White City or City of the Monkey God.

However, comparing his expedition with the one 80 or so years earlier allows him to discuss scientific advancements especially of lidar which will revolutionize the field.

Despite any advancements, adventure and danger go hand-in-hand during Preston's expedition. That danger doesn't seem to be ill-founded.

The expedition had to overcome impenetrable jungle, quickmud, one of the world's most aggressive and deadly snakes, the fer-de-lance, and disease carrying insects.

In fact, tropical disease strikes most of those in the expedition something they don't realize until they're back in their home countries.

Identifying and treating the disease they have contracted becomes another mystery to solve; this mystery and discussion of the disease dominates the final sections of the book.

Oct 03, J. Definitely one of the best books I read in This is an incredibly fascinating and detailed book involving science, history, and adventure.

Highly recommended. View all 16 comments. Who knew that there were so many civilizations in the Northern Hemisphere, The Lost City of the Monkey God takes us deep into the Mosquitia region of the Gracias a Dios Department in eastern Honduras, where the legendary "White City" supposedly existed.

Lidar is able to map the ground even through dense rain forest, delineating any archaeological features that might be present.

What they found was a huge city. Was it the legendary "White City"? Who knows. What ensues is the physical search of the area.

If you have read any books on entering tropical rain forests you know they are fraught with dangers, while I appreciate the amount of time, effort and money invested in this project I am not wholly convinced that it is the riveting tale we are lead to believe we are getting.

It is more a long version of the National Geographic article. From here Preston, takes off on a tangent about how those in the archaeology of Central America community attacked their expedition because Elkins billed it as finding the LOST "White City" which they archaeologist believe is a myth.

The last part of the book is about Leishmaniasis, the disease that Preston and many of his fellow crew members caught.

It was interesting to learn what treatment they went through to contain the disease. Preston then goes on to speculate that the people of the city they found where wiped out by some disease that occurred during the contact period with explorers.

There is nothing to back this up. I read this book because Dana Stabenow rated with 5 stars and provided a rave review.

I was not so impressed. This review was originally posted on The Pfaeffle Journal I'm glad that I reserved the audio at my library.

I enjoyed this story, but was slightly disappointed at the time spent actually exploring. The beginning of the book goes into previous expeditions to areas near this city and the problems faced due to the fact that Honduras can be a very dangerous country.

Not only due to the insects, snakes and other poisonous creatures, but also because of The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story is not my normal cuppa, but came to me highly recommended.

Not only due to the insects, snakes and other poisonous creatures, but also because of drug cartels. The brief portion that involved the actual exploration was fascinating.

Imagine going into an area completely untouched by mankind in hundred years. How exciting! However, the actuality of exploring such an area means exposing oneself to thousands of dangers from extremely deep mud, insects of all kinds, snakes and even jaguars, to name just a few.

There was another brief section talking about the problems with other archaeologists and academia throwing shade on this expedition, some of them doing so with no REAL knowledge of what went on, how LIDAR worked and what was found.

Lastly, and the part I found most interesting, was what happened to many of the explorers after they got home and that is: Leishmaniasis.

This is a disease, actually many diseases and symptoms, grouped under one name , which is mainly carried by tiny sand flies.

The havoc this disease can wreak is almost unbelievable. This led to another section of the book which spoke about new world diseases and how they affected the Americas.

There is talk of how some of the early civilizations disappeared and how that may have been caused by parasites and diseases.

I found all of this fascinating but extremely scary. Most especially when it was mentioned that cases of Leish have now been found in Texas and the speculation about how that is because sand flies are moving northward due to climate change.

What I found most surprising is that many of the explorers that were diagnosed and treated for Leish, jumped at the chance to go back to the site.

I enjoyed this book and I learned a lot about Honduras and its history. I recommend The Lost City of the Monkey God to anyone interested in learning more about Honduras, the city and the history of the world, in general.

Libraries RULE! View all 9 comments. Special thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

It's no secret that I love Douglas Preston. I've read and reread his co-authored Special Agent Pendergast series multiple times.

I've worked with the publishers for the past few years for ARCs of that series and interviewed Mr. Preston and Lincoln Child, his Pendergast co-author.

I've read pretty much everything they've both ever written, with a few things still remaining on my to-read p Special thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

I've read pretty much everything they've both ever written, with a few things still remaining on my to-read pile. I also love adventure stories.

Lost temples, jungle treks, scary wildlife, special teams going in to discover the past I subscribe to Preston's email newsletters, and I was aware of his long-term interest in the lost White City of Honduras.

I paid attention when they used the lidar to map some potential locations of this city in the Honduran jungles, and gobbled up details when they set out on their expedition.

This book provides Preston's account of his take on the whole scenario -- from the history of the search for the lost city, to his actual involvement, to the aftereffects of that fateful journey.

It's a solid read, which I expect from Preston, who is a fantastic writer. My biggest gripe is the end. I know it's a non-fiction weaving of historical detail into modern day adventure memoir, but the last few chapters focus solely on the deadly and scary disease that affects much of the third world, and hit many of the explorers.

It turns from a lesson on the White City and a recording of the adventure into a public service notice about the future of the disease and the need for treatments to be researched and available to all, not only because the disease is quickly passing from third world into first world, but mostly because of the millions of people it affects and the tens of thousands it kills on a yearly basis in the third world, where they have no financial ability to pay for treatment and big pharm sees no profit in it.

Don't get me wrong -- I entirely agree with Preston's views on the subject. I think my problem was that the book was about the adventure into what might have been the source for the legends of the Lost City of the Monkey God, so rather than ending on the disease chapters, those could have been put into the middle and the ending been something more suited to the adventurous side of the tale and how much more we have to learn from the past.

Just my opinion, but that's what reviews are. Either way, I read very little non-fiction, and this book kept my focus and my attention, and showcases Preston's strong talents.

You should really take the opportunity to follow in Preston and team's footsteps into the jungles of Honduras. Just watch out for the venomous and aggressive fer-de-lance snakes and the leish-transmitting sandflies Lucky for you, you're safe on your couch.

Wow, well this had a little bit of everything! Archeological adventure story, ancient culture history, Honduras politics, revelations about lesser-known diseases and more.

Loved it from beginning to end. View 1 comment. It was reputed to be a city of immense wealth. Indigenous tribes warned that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die.

There have been many stories about sightings of this lost city. Some of these outright hoaxes. None have proven it's existence.

In the twentieth century there were several expeditions to locate this lost city. Probably the most famous being an expedition led by Theodore Morde in He returned with thousands of artifacts to back his claim of having discovered the city but committed suicide and never revealed it's location.

Using an advanced laser-imaging technology called LIDAR they were able to penetrate the dense jungle canopy to detect man-made anomalies at two locations.

Flying in a rickety plane, Vietnam era helicopters, sleeping in a jungle infested with venomous snakes and disease carrying insects.

They had returned from the first expedition thinking they were lucky to have all survived only to discover later that half of them had contracted a horrific, sometimes lethal, and incurable disease.

There is a bit of history and politics here too. I had heard stories about the impact when the Old World and New World collided and how disease wiped out many of the indigenous tribes.

This book reminded me of how devastating it was. There was the difficulty of dealing with the seeming ever changing Honduran government and obtaining permits.

Then there were the problems with the academic community which labeled the expedition as adventurers and treasure hunters.

The book ends with a warning about climate change and the increased danger of pandemics as the world is shrinking and a disease is only a plane ride away from any civilization.

An adventure story with a message. View all 4 comments. I was expecting a non-fiction adventure story told by one of my favorite thriller authors, but this book really covers a lot more territory than that.

In the La Mosquitia region of Honduras, there was rumored to be a lost city where people once worshipped a monkey like statue.

There were also rumors about the unfortunate fate that would befall people who went looking for this city.

Weitere Https://heartlandtrading.co/how-to-win-online-casino/bad-pyrmont-parken.php finden Sie in:. Ironically - as The Lost City illustrates - that's exactly what our short-sighted civilization is doing right now' James Patterson. To confirm the discovery, Preston and the team battled torrential rains, quickmud, plagues of insects, jaguars, and deadly snakes. Dank der Lehre bei verschiedenen daoistischen Meistern erlernt Sun Wukong nicht nur das Kämpfen, sondern auch die Fähigkeit, sehr hoch zu springen und sich auf 72 verschiedene Weisen zu verwandeln. Suspenseful and here, filled with history, adventure and dramatic twists of fortune, The Lost City of the Monkey God is the absolutely true, Monkey God account of one of the great discoveries of the twenty-first century. Die gelernten Künste missbraucht er für allerlei Streiche. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Erste Bewertung verfassen. Inswashbuckling journalist Theodore Morde returned from the rainforest with hundreds of artefacts and an electrifying story of having found the City - but then committed suicide without revealing its location. Three quarters of a century laterbestselling author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists on a groundbreaking new quest. Die Stadt des Affengottes. Aber er will mehr — er will Unsterblichkeit und please click for source Thron des Jadekaisers. Douglas lives in New Mexico. Die Stadt des Affengottes. Suspenseful and shocking, filled with history, adventure and dramatic twists of fortune, The Lost City of the Monkey God is the absolutely true, eyewitness account of one of the great discoveries of the here century. Am Anfang, als Sun den Himmel erobert, rather Restaurant Salzburg thanks er egoistisch und genusssüchtig und gleicht sehr den Dämonen, die er später bekämpft, und die für Schwierigkeiten bei der Entwicklung von Einsicht und Mitgefühl stehen. Preston's book offers rewards for both the mystery fan and the nonfiction aficionado.

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